Jesse Broadwater Teams Up
With T.R.U. Ball to Target
Cancer Research Jesse Broadwater Teams Up With T.R.U. Ball to Target Cancer Research

What would you do if you won thousands of dollars? Would you take an exotic trip? Buy something you’ve always wanted? Splurge on top-of-the-line archery equipment?

Or would you use it to change the world?

Jesse Broadwater, a field and target archer known for his generous spirit, did hit the jackpot recently. And the choice he made? 

He ponied up the cash to fight cancer – and worked with one of his key sponsors to make the donation even more meaningful. 

Part of Broadwater’s income comes from corporate sponsorships. Much like other professional athletes, his earnings are affected by how well he performs and the deals he inks with companies.

In that regard, Broadwater operates much like Dale Junior. Earnhardt earns money from every victory lap and sticker on his car. Those “credits” outfit him with top-of-the line racecars. Likewise, when your favorite NFL or MLB team wins the Super Bowl or World Series, the players get bonuses, pay raises, new equipment and maybe even a trip to Disney World.

But instead of buying new equipment or taking his wife and three kids to “the most magical place on Earth,” Broadwater did something that rivals Disney’s magic: Together with T.R.U. Ball Archery, he donated proceeds totaling $30,207 to breast-cancer research.

I had no idea (this fund) was doing that well,” Broadwater said to Our Town. “I just wanted to give back to someone who’s going to use it and try to help people in need. That makes me feel good. That’s what keeps me going.”

Photo Credit: World Archery

Photo Credit: World Archery

How did Broadwater raise the money? The answer’s in the ink, so to speak.

Broadwater is sponsored by T.R.U. Ball Archery. He believes in T.R.U. Ball’s products, and they believe in his archery skills. Last year, Broadwater and T.R.U. Ball teamed up to design two release aids, the Abyss and FulKrum, which compound-bow shooters use to release the bowstring.

As a product designer, Broadwater could keep part of the proceeds. But instead of pocketing his piece of the profits to help support his family, he requested that 100 percent of the profits for the Jesse Broadwater Signature Series go toward breast-cancer research at the Windber Research Institute.

The buck doesn’t stop here.

T.R.U. Ball matched that donation, and in April Broadwater and T.R.U. Ball presented the Institute with the largest single donation it ever received.

T.R.U. Ball President Gregory Summers credits Broadwater as the “big heart” in this story, but Broadwater thinks otherwise.

I want to make sure you all know the generosity is definitely not all me,” Broadwater posted on Facebook. “Greg and his family at T.R.U. Ball are the ones who not only allowed this to be possible, but so graciously wanted to give, too.”

And that’s not all: Broadwater and T.R.U. Ball will present a matched donation quarterly for the lifetime sale of the Jesse Broadwater Signature Series releases.

Giving provides a certain gift to the giver. For Broadwater, that’s helping his fans, teammates, sponsors and family

When competing out of town, Jesse wears different-colored shoelaces to honor his children: pink for the girls and blue for the boys.

When competing out of town, Jesse wears different-colored shoelaces to honor his children: pink for the girls and blue for the boys.

Giving back is what it’s all about,” Broadwater said. “It’s what makes me feel good, and what I want my kids to notice. I see the same values in Greg Summers, and his family and company.”

Broadwater’s an archer by trade. He’s a seven-time national champion and consistently enjoys record-breaking success. But he’s also a philanthropist, and it’s no wonder he’s one of the archery community’s favorite competitors.

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